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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

1 edition of Managing trees and stands susceptible to western spruce budworm found in the catalog.

Managing trees and stands susceptible to western spruce budworm

Managing trees and stands susceptible to western spruce budworm

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Published by U.S. Forest Service, Cooperative State Research Service in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Western spruce budworm -- West (U.S.)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMartha H. Brookes ... [et al.], technical coordinators ; Canada/United States Spruce Budworms Program-West.
    SeriesTechnical bulletin -- no. 1695., Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 1695.
    ContributionsBrookes, Martha H., United States. Cooperative State Research Service., Canada/United States Spruce Budworms Program.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 111 p. :
    Number of Pages111
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16032837M

    For example, although white spruce and balsam fir are equally susceptible to infestations by the spruce budworm, balsam fir is more likely to die than is spruce. In addition to tree mortality, repeated defoliation by budworms causes surviving trees to lose diameter, height, and volume, all of . The montane forests (i.e. below about m altitude) of the Colorado Front Range have experienced repeated outbreaks of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) and Douglas fir bark beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae), both of which locally attack Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). The effects were studied of (historically documented) outbreaks of these insects on succession Cited by:

    Younger trees are the ones most susceptible to death by defoliation. They don’t have enough foliage to survive an onslaught of feeding. When spruce budworms eat needles, the tree can no longer photosynthesize. Young stands can also suffer if defoliation persists for several years. Mehmel says that mature trees can. Western spruce budworm outbreaks may result in significant modification of susceptible stands by reducing tree density and cover. Losses of existing cover may degrade the quality of habitat available for some wildlife species such as the northern spotted owl, and associated fuel accumulations may increase the risk of catastrophic wildfire.

    The moth favors primarily Douglas fir, grand fir, and subalpine fir trees, but can also affect Engelmann spruce and western larch trees. Spruce budworm larvae devour a tree’s new foliage, causing the tips of the tree’s branches to appear reddish-brown. Although spruce budworm is a destructive defoliator, it typically doesn’t kill the tree. Spruce Budworms Program (CANUS A), aimed at the spruce budworm in the wholly East and the western spruce budworm in the West. seriesThe objective of CANUSA was to design and evaluate strategies for controlling the spruce and managing budworm-forests to help forest managers attain their objectives an economically and environmentally manner. The work.


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Managing trees and stands susceptible to western spruce budworm Download PDF EPUB FB2

MANAGING TREES AND STANDS SUSCEPTIBLE TO WESTERN SPRUCE BUDWORM [Martha H.; Colbert, J. J.; Mitchell, Russel; G.; and, Stark, R. Brookes] on *FREE. The book, which comprises 8 chapters with separate authors, is a guide for detecting and evaluating the effects or potential effects of Choristoneura occidentalis on forests in western USA and Canada, for comparing management strategies and for providing support for decisions related to budworm.

Managing trees and stands susceptible to Cited by: Managing trees and stands susceptible to western spruce budworm. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Forest Service, Cooperative State Research Service, (OCoLC) Managing Trees and Stands Susceptible to Western Spruce Budworm by Brookes, M.h.

Et Al at Pemberley Books. western spruce budworm and provides background for the recommendations contained in two management books: Managin f^ Trees and Stands Susceptible to Western Spruce Budworm, and.

Western Spruce Budworm and Forest-Management Planning. These management books are intended to stand alone to provide easy access to just the.

budworm Trees of all ages are susceptible, although mature forests are preferentially attacked. Mortality is often associated with suppressed or younger trees, particularly in multi-layered stands.

Mature trees may also die from the western spruce budworm, depending upon the length and intensity of the outbreak and general tree vigour. Stand response to these outbreaks is primarily a function of stand structure and age characteristics of Douglas-fir prior to an outbreak.

Young, vigorous postfire stands show minimal budworm defoliation, and in these stands only remnant trees from the prefire generation appear susceptible to Cited by: Tree ring chronologies from 24 mixed-conifer stands were used to reconstruct the long-term history of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) in northern New Mexico.

Alternative species are less susceptible to budworm feeding. Even-age silviculture systems (clearcut, seed tree, shelterwood) can work in appropriate ecosystems in conjunction with the promotion or planting of alternative species. Species less susceptible to western spruce budworm include: western larch, lodgepole and ponderosa pine and spruce.

Western spruce budworm females prefer to lay their eggs on foliage from older ( yr old) over younger ( yr old) Douglas-fir trees (Figs. 1 and 2) Managing trees and stands susceptible to western spruce budworm. U.S. Dep. Agric. For. Serv. Tech. Bull. ,Cited by:   The western spruce budworm (WSB; Choristoneura freemani Razowski) shapes Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests throughout western North America with periodic, severe landscape-level defoliation events.

The largest and most continuous recorded defoliation occurred in the s, largely centered in the Williams Lake and Mile House WSB outbreak Cited by: 1.

Stands having less than 30 percent true firs and Douglas-fir have low susceptibility to western spruce budworm outbreaks.

Although thinning does not prevent defoliation, the promotion of vigorous growth by thinning susceptible stands may help to reduce the quality of budworm habitat while enhancing the ability of trees to better withstand the effects of defoliation.

Stands in the IDF are by far the most susceptible to western spruce budworm defoliation. Over 30% of the total defoliation recorded over the Kamloops Forest Region land base since has occurred in the IDF.

Approximately 45% of the IDF ( ha) (Fig. 3) has sustained defoliation at some by: Douglas-fir stands. The western spruce budworm will affect management of Douglas-fir, spruce, and subalpine fir stands.

Stands were hazard rated for susceptibility and risk rated for loss. These data are provided in Tables 3, and 4, and Appendix 1. Mountain Pine Beetle Stands were grouped by successional role for lodgepole pine and hazard rated by.

Managing trees and stands susceptible to western spruce budworm. Tech. Bull. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service; Objective: To provide a comprehensive review of sampling Larix occidentalis Nutt., in the western USA and Canada.

Infestations in mature stands cause growth loss, top kill, and occasional. Trees weakened by spruce budworm may be predisposed to damage from other agents like bark beetles.

Though spruce budworm damage usually is restricted to native trees, ornamental trees also can be affected. Budworm outbreaks occur in cycles lasting 3 to 10 years in moist stands and up to 30 years in dry stands. stand habitat code is used to determine what species is climax (Appendix 2).

Host trees are Douglas-fir, grand fir, subalpine fir and spruce. Although western larch is a host of the western spruce budworm, its presence does not influence the hazard.

The following equations will compute the crown area that each sample tree represents. Influence of past forestry practices on western spruce budworm defoliation and associated impacts in southern British Columbia.

Managing trees and stands. susceptible to western spruce. Stand susceptibility to eastern spruce budworm seems to be strongly related to stand age and size of balsam fir, specifically, oldest stands are the most damaged from defoliation. Adjusting age and structure of regenerating stands has been shown to reduce the susceptibility of forests to eastern spruce budworm defoliation (Miller & Rusnock ).Cited by: Grand fir is susceptible to numerous insects.

The most troublesome are western spruce budworm, Douglas-fir tussock moth, western balsam bark beetle, and fir engraver beetle [71,80,]. Timing of, and slash disposal following, thinning are important precautions in avoiding fir engraver attacks.

spruce trees are susceptible to western spruce budworm outbreaks. Multi-storied stands, where regeneration of these tree species is abundant in the understory, are especially favorable for western spruce budworm outbreaks due to the ability of larvae to rappel out of large trees—a behavior known as “ballooning”—to landFile Size: 5MB.The spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, Clem., is the most significant defoliating pest of boreal balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) and spruce (Picea sp.) in North America.

Historically, spruce budworm outbreaks have been managed via a reactive, foliage protection approach focused on keeping trees alive rather than stopping the outbreak.Maturity of Trees and Stands Susceptibility to western spruce budworm tends to increase as trees and stands mature.

Older stands have far greater foliar biomass than young stands and can support much larger populations of the insect.

Young even-aged host stands less than 30 years old are poor habitat for the in.